Academic Catalog 2020-2021

Slippery Rock University

Academic Services

Contact Info
ChairSecretaryLocationDepartment Phone
Musiette ClayJennifer Stroup109 Bailey Library724-738-2012

Department Web Site URL

Academics Support Resources

College Skills Workshop

During the fall, the Tutorial Center offers an array of workshops designed to help students succeed in college. All students are eligible to participate in the workshops on such topics as managing time, taking effective class notes, reading texts, building a strong memory, and increasing test-taking skills.

Tutorial Center

Slippery Rock University’s Tutorial Center assists undergraduate students in meeting their academic goals with free peer individual and group tutoring services, study skills workshops, and Supplemental Instruction (SI). Emphasis upon basic skills and upon the Liberal Studies areas, study skills instruction and support, communication with faculty, and extensive training and supervision of tutors meet students’ immediate academic and content based needs and provide them with effective and transferable study skills. Tutorial services at Slippery Rock University are personalized and tailored to individuals’ academic needs.

Tutoring services also include the proactive Supplemental Instruction (SI) model for academic assistance. Students hired as leaders attend assigned classes and work closely with enrolled students to model and teach study skills strategies. Leaders facilitate group-tutoring sessions emphasizing cooperative learning activities.

Individual tutoring sessions for students are scheduled by appointment or on a drop-in basis, whereas group and SI sessions are scheduled to accommodate the greatest number of interested students.

Advisement Resources

Academic Advisement

Academic Advisement is perhaps the most important faculty/student relationship outside the classroom. The University’s academic advisement system is comprised of two primary organizational structures that include First Year Studies advisement and upper-class student/transfer student advisement.

Advisement Development

Academic Services is responsible for developing adviser and student advising resources, conducting adviser training and first year student advising informational workshops, and maintaining its involvement in retention-related and first-year research activities.

First Year Studies (FYRST) Advisement

All academic advisement of new freshmen is coordinated and directed by FYRST. The mission of FYRST advising is to personalize the first year by ensuring that every student receives a high standard of academic advisement services from pre-enrollment to orientation, and throughout the student’s first year. FYRST advising provides assistance that will help students to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to select an academic program or major which best suits their individual abilities, interests and career goals. During the student’s enrollment in FYRST, he/she should develop a more thorough understanding of his/her own purpose and goals in college as well as those of the university. If a new freshman has declared a major, advisement will be provided by a faculty member selected from the major department. If no major has been declared, the student will be actively involved in the Exploratory Program and advised by a selected faculty member who has volunteered to work with students who have not decided upon a major. Progression through FYRST will be assisted by the faculty adviser, however, it is the student’s responsibility to see that he/she meets all requirements of the degree granting college so that upon completion of the first year of study, the student has attained the minimum number of credits, the specified courses and the minimum grade point average required by the major department.

Upper-Class Student/Transfer Student Advisement

As a student progresses from FYRST to the degree-granting college, some departments may reassign their students to different academic advisers during the upper-division years, while other departments may permit the student to retain the FYRST adviser throughout his/her years of study at the university. Upon entrance into the university, new transfer students are assigned academic advisers from their major program.

Exploratory (Undeclared) Program

Students entering the university who are exploring majors participate in the Exploratory Program. These students are advised by FYRST advisers who volunteer their time to advise students as part of the Exploratory Program. The faculty identified as FYRST Exploratory advisers have an interest in and a commitment to assisting new students in their transition to college life. Nearly all Exploratory students are advised by members of the Academic Services Department.

Freshman Seminar (FYRST Seminar)

The freshman seminar course is designed especially to enhance the academic, social, and personal integration of the student by focusing on transition topics related to the college environment (e.g., time management, active learning strategies, note-taking skills, test preparation, goal setting, use of campus technology, academic advising, major and career exploration, professional development in the technology fields, diversity, relationship issues, and issues of wellness).

Learning Community Clusters

The university implemented a learning community cluster program which includes a freshman seminar for the purpose of improving students’ academic and social integration and establishing an educational environment that maximizes both student-student interaction, student-faculty and student-professional staff interaction. The transition to university life can be challenging and even stressful. The academic and social advantages provided by joining a learning community cluster and freshman seminar initiative can help reduce that stress. By enrolling in the same classes, students are encouraged to meet new people, make friends easily, form study groups, participate in class discussions, and become engaged with their professors.

Research has shown that the more students connect to the university, the more successful they are in their college experience. Our research shows that by enhancing a student’s sense of community and involvement, the freshman seminar and learning community clusters contribute to higher retention rates. Because both freshman seminars and learning communities promote active learning and foster collaboration and cooperation, students who participate are higher achievers and more involved in their classes.

Faculty 

Christa Brahler
Instructor
Academic Services
M.A., Slippery Rock University
B.A., Indiana University

Musiette Clay
Instructor
Academic Services
M.A., Slippery Rock University
B.S., Slippery Rock University

Amber Hamilton
Instructor
Academic Services
M.Ed., University of North Carolina
B.A., University of Virginia

Annette Salsovic
Assistant Professor
Academic Services
M.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
B.S., Slippery Rock University

Courses

ACSD Courses

ACSD 109 -  Developmental Mathematics  

This course covers basic arithmetic skills necessary for successful completion of basic algebra. Topics include basic operations using whole numbers, fractions and decimals, ratios and proportions, percents, and solving equations. Students not exempted from ACSD 109 must successfully complete this course before enrolling in ACSD 110. Students must pass a standard proficiency exam to pass this course. Course grading: A, B, C, or NC. Credit earned in this course will not count toward the university's 120 credit hour minimum required for graduation. )

Credits: 3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

ACSD 110 -  Beginning Algebra  

An overview of introductory algebra concepts, this course covers topics such as: simplifying variable expressions, solving equations and applications problems, simplifying polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions, graphing linear equations, solving systems of linear equations, and simplifying radical expressions. Students who are placed into this course are expected to possess certain minimum competencies in arithmetic skills, and they must pass a standard proficiency exam to pass this course. Course grading: A, B, C, or NC. Prerequisite: ACSD 109 or exemption from ACSD 109. Credit earned in this course will not count toward the university's 120 credit hour minimum required for graduation.

Credits: 3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered Fall, Spring, & Summer

ACSD 139 -  University Seminar  

University Seminar serves as the entry point to the Slippery Rock University general education program. With its strong faculty-student interaction, the course promotes intellectual inquiry, critical and creative thinking, and academic excellence. Through varied content, the course introduces students to academic discourse and information literacy while exploring topics such as diversity and inclusion and global awareness. This course will set students along the path to becoming engaged with issues and scholarship important to a 21st century education while they learn about themselves and their place in the world.

Credits: 3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Freshman 1 or Freshman 2.
Enrollment limited to students with the ROCK STUDIES STUDENT attribute.

ACSD 190 -  Experimental  

A unique and specifically focused course within the general purview of a department which intends to offer it on a "one time only" basis and not as a permanent part of the department's curriculum.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

ACSD 195 -  Workshop  

A workshop is a program which is usually of short duration, narrow in scope, often non-traditional in content and format, and on a timely topic.

Credits: 1-6

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

ACSD 198 -  Selected Topics  

A Selected Topics course is a normal, departmental offering which is directly related to the discipline, but because of its specialized nature, may not be able to be offered on a yearly basis by the department.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

ACSD 290 -  Experimental  

A unique and specifically focused course within the general purview of a department which intends to offer it on a "one time only" basis and not as a permanent part of the department's curriculum.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

ACSD 295 -  Workshop  

A workshop is a program which is usually of short duration, narrow in scope, often non-traditional in content and format, and on a timely topic.

Credits: 1-6

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

ACSD 298 -  Selected Topics  

A Selected Topics course is a normal, departmental offering which is directly related to the discipline, but because of its specialized nature, may not be able to be offered on a yearly basis by the department.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

ACSD 390 -  Experimental  

A unique and specifically focused course within the general purview of a department which intends to offer it on a "one time only" basis and not as a permanent part of the department's curriculum.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Students with a semester level of Freshman 1, Freshman 2 or Sophomore 1 may not enroll.

ACSD 395 -  Workshop  

A workshop is a program which is usually of short duration, narrow in scope, often non-traditional in content and format, and on a timely topic.

Credits: 1-6

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Students with a semester level of Freshman 1, Freshman 2 or Sophomore 1 may not enroll.

ACSD 398 -  Selected Topics  

A Selected Topics course is a normal, departmental offering which is directly related to the discipline, but because of its specialized nature, may not be able to be offered on a yearly basis by the department.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Students with a semester level of Freshman 1, Freshman 2 or Sophomore 1 may not enroll.

ACSD 490 -  Independent Study  

Independent Study courses give students the opportunity to pursue research and/or studies that are not part of the university’s traditional course offerings. Students work one on one or in small groups with faculty guidance and are typically required to submit a final paper or project as determined by the supervising professor.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

ACSD 495 -  Workshop  

A workshop is a program which is usually of short duration, narrow in scope, often non-traditional in content and format, and on a timely topic.

Credits: 1-6

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Students with a semester level of Freshman 1, Freshman 2 or Sophomore 1 may not enroll.

ACSD 498 -  Selected Topics  

A Selected Topics course is a normal, departmental offering which is directly related to the discipline, but because of its specialized nature, may not be able to be offered on a yearly basis by the department.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Students with a semester level of Freshman 1, Freshman 2 or Sophomore 1 may not enroll.

INDS Courses

INDS 101 -  FYRST Seminar  

The FYRST Seminar provides students with an opportunity to become integrated into the university's community of learners by exploring the purpose and value of higher education, participating in the teaching/learning process, addressing academic and social transition issues, utilizing campus programs, services, and technology, and developing academic skills and learning strategies during the student's first semester at Slippery Rock University. This course is a one credit hour course designed to especially and exclusively assist first year students in their adjustment to college life at Slippery Rock University. No prerequisite. Enrollment by advisement. Open to first year students only. The credit earned in this course counts for graduation requirements.

Credits: 1

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered Fall & Spring Terms

INDS 102 -  Learning Strategies  

Students will develop effective learning strategies, goals, and decision-making skills with a view toward implementing a plan to remove their probationary status and become a student in "good academic standing.This course is primarily for students on academic probation (other students may enroll with the permission of the instructor). Credits earned count for graduation as an elective.

Credits: 1

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

INDS 103 -  Major and Career Exploration  

This course will examine various decision making models as they are applied to choosing an academic major and/or career. Through a variety of in-class and out-of-class activities students will integrate self-knowledge and knowledge about majors and the world of work.

Credits: 1

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

INDS 121 -  Freshman Reseach and Mentoring  

The FRAME Seminar introduces students to academic research skills. Students will collaborate with faculty mentors, peers and professionals to develop skills in methodologies, analyses and dissemination of scholarly work. The seminar course is intended for second semester freshman.

Prerequisite: INDS 101D
D Requires minimum grade of D.

Credits: 1

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Freshman 1 or Freshman 2.