Academic Catalog 2020-2021

Slippery Rock University

English

Contact Info
ChairAssistant ChairSecretaryLocationDepartment Phone
Dr. Danette DiMarcoDr. Mark O'ConnorCatherine Saylor316 Spotts World Culture Building724-738-2043

Department Web Site URL

Graduate Coordinator
Dr. Jason Stuart

Faculty

William Covey
Professor
English
Ph.D., Purdue University
M.A., Northern Illinois University
B.A., Northern Illinois University

Danette Dimarco
Professor
English
Ph.D., Duquesne University
M.A., Duquesne University
B.A., Duquesne University

Maureen Gallagher
Instructor
English
Ph.D., Duquesne University
M.A., Georgia State University
B.A., St. John's College

Jessica Jopp
Instructor
English
M.F.A., University of Massachusetts
B.A., SUNY-Binghamton

Nicholas Katsiadas
Instructor
English
M.A., Slippery Rock University
B.A., Slippery Rock University

Christopher Kreiser
Associate Professor
English
Ph.D., Texas A & M University
M.A., Texas A & M University
B.A., Tulane University

Joshua Lee
Instructor
English
Ph.D., University of Kentucky
M.A., Virginia Tech University
B.A., Virginia Tech University

Patrick McGinty
Instructor
English
M.F.A., Portland State University
B.A., Denison University

Julie Naviaux
Assistant Professor
English
Ph.D., University of Kentucky
M.A., University of Louisville
B.A., Bellarmine University

Mark O'Connor
Associate Professor
English
Ph.D., University of Houston
M.A., University of Houston
B.A., Georgetown University

Timothy Oldakowski
Associate Professor
English
B.A., Duquesne University

Joan Peacock
Professor
English
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University
M.A., University of North Texas
B.A., University of Madras (India)

Rachela Permenter
Professor
English
Ph.D., Northern Illinois University
M.A., Kent State University
B.S., Kent State University

Derrick Pitard
Professor
English
Ph.D., University of Rochester
M.A., University of Rochester
M.Phil., University of Oxford (England)
B.A., Washington and Lee University

Timothy Ruppert
Assistant Professor
English
Ph.D., Duquesne University
M.A., Duquesne University
B.A., Duquesne University

Erica Scott
Associate Professor
English
Ph.D., Miami University (Oxford, Ohio)
M.A., Miami University (Oxford, Ohio)
M.A., Gannon University
B.A., Pennsylvania State University

Lauren Shoemaker
Instructor
English
Ph.D., Indiana University
M.A., Gannon University
B.S., Slippery Rock University

John Silvestro
Assistant Professor
English
Ph.D., Miami University
M.A., Northern Kentucky University
B.S., Ohio University

Ryan Stryffeler
Instructor
English
Ph.D., Ball State University
M.A., Northern Arizona University
B.A., Hillsdale College

Jason Stuart
Assistant Professor
English
Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University
M.A., Slippery Rock University
B.A., Immaculata University

Frederick White
Associate Professor
English
Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles
M.A., Azusa Pacific University
B.A., Azusa Pacific University

Krista White
Instructor
English
M.A., Youngstown State University
B.A., Youngstown State University

Courses

ENGL 590 -  Experimental  

A unique and specifically focused course within the general purview of a department which intends to offer it on a "one time only" basis and not as a permanent part of the department's curriculum.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Graduate.

ENGL 595 -  Workshop  

A workshop is a program which is usually of short duration, narrow in scope, often non-traditional in content and format, and on a timely topic.

Credits: 1-6

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Graduate or Post Baccalaureate.

ENGL 598 -  Selected Topics  

A Selected Topics course is a normal, departmental offering which is directly related to the discipline, but because of its specialized nature, may not be able to be offered on a yearly basis by the department.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Graduate or Post Baccalaureate.

ENGL 601 -  Introduction to Writing in the Disciplines  

This course traces the development of the study of literate practices within professions and disciplines, identifying research methods, areas of inquiry and current gaps in knowledge. The various social, technological, teleological and rhetorical factors that influence the forms and practices of writing within human enterprises and activities are examined.

Credits: 3

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 602 -  Rhetoric Theory  

Students will study theory and research in rhetoric and media that examine the uses of verbal and visual communication. Students will read in foundational works in classical, medieval, modern and contemporary rhetoric. The course will explore the interdisciplinary value of persuasive communication, particularly in light of pervasive digital and network technologies. Studies in contemporary rhetoric are therefore supplemented by investigations into culture and media; the course also focuses on new modes of writing and publishing enabled by computer technology.

Credits: 3

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 603 -  Literary and Cultural Studies  

This course will introduce students to the history and range of methods used and genres produced within the disciplines of literary and cultural studies. Students will study the history and development of journalistic and academic genres of literary criticism; the expansion of interdisciplinary applications of theory to analysis of literary and cultural texts; new forms of "distant" reading, through data mining and related collaboration with the computer sciences; intersections of literary and cultural analysis with the cognitive neuroscience3s and other scientific fields; and the persistence of formal analysis in subfields of ciriticism and creative writing.

Credits: 3

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 620 -  Linguistics and Writing  

Serves as introduction to basic language structure, use and theories. The course will introduce the scientific study of language; familiarize students with the linguistic knowledge held by native speakers of any language; foster an appreciation of the complexity of spoken and written forms of English; and explore language variation, specifically English social dialects, as well as how attitudes toward these variations reflect ideology.

Credits: 3

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 621 -  The Teaching of Writing and Literature  

This course extends into practice the theoretical considerations of English 602 and 603. Students will study and practice techniques for teaching writing and literature.

Credits: 3

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 627 -  Evolution of Writing  

This course applies a variety of theories, disciplinary constructs and empirical investigations to an understanding of the dynamics of genre formation, helping students identify genre theory as a category of inquiry. This course examines the ways by which exisiting and evolving forms of writing found in classrooms, disciplines, professions and civic colloquies assume cultural importance and expand social constraints. the course explores problems of general description and definition, including taxonomy, semantic ontology, conventionality, mediation and social/organizational knowledge. Also, the course considers how learning, social interactiona and a sense of agency contribute to the textual and contextual features of various written forms, inclluding shared ideological constructs, choices of media and other features.

Credits: 3

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Graduate.
Enrollment limited to students in the MA 9525 or MA 9527 programs.

ENGL 642 -  Digital Writing and Publishing  

Digital Writing and Publishing explores the variety of publication and archival practices in the digital media age, the gathering, categorizing and analyzing of information as preparation for writing in new and hybrid media, and the presentation of academic work to multiple audiences. This course emphasizes the social activity of scholarship within and beyond the boundaries of the 21st century learning institution, emphasizing the implications of networked communication for contemporary writing, with a focus on how swriters expand their appeal across disciplinary boundaries and to the public. By approaching the possibilities and practices for creation, distribution, curation, indexing, and storing of digital media, Digital Writing and Publishing will help knowledge workers confront the challenges of creating meaningful content for their peers and the public.

Credits: 3

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Graduate.
Enrollment limited to students in the MA 9527 program.

ENGL 656 -  Seminar in Visual Rhetoric  

Will instruct masters students in the professional writing program in the theory and practice of visual rhetoric in technical design and familiarize them with the growing body of empirical research into how visual persuasiveness is achieved in professional documents.

Credits: 3

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 659 -  Researching Academic and Professional Writing  

Expands upon the research mehtods first discussed in the introductory course, closely considering research in writing in the disciplines (WID), with a focus on text, practices and processes. Students will embark on a research project that could carry over into the Consultancy course that serves as a capstone for the program.

Credits: 3

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Graduate.
Enrollment limited to students in the MA 9525 or MA 9527 programs.

ENGL 660 -  Seminar: Creative Writing  

Provides students with the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing poetry, fiction or dramatic writing (stage or screen). While the student will be expected to become knowledgeable of the techniques of each genre, the major writing project for each student will focus on one genre. Thus, while providing a wide range of options for the advanced student, the course provides depth and focus in one selected genre. The course may be repeated up to six credits.

Credits: 3

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 690 -  Experimental  

A unique and specifically focused course within the general purview of a department which intends to offer it on a "one time only" basis and not as a permanent part of the department's curriculum.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 695 -  Workshop  

A workshop is a program which is usually of short duration, narrow in scope, often non-traditional in content and format, and on a timely topic.

Credits: 1-6

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 697 -  Consultancy in Writing in the Disciplines  

As the program's capstone, the course offers students the opportunity to work with representatives of other disciplines and professional organizations to facilitate research or to foster interdisciplinary writing or interdisciplinary writing instruction. through relationships with schoalrs and professionals outside English studies students will develop competencies in interdisciplinary writing methods; sharpen both their conceptual and prcedural iknowledge of another discipline or profession; amplifity their expertise in writing or teaching across the disciplines; improve their skills in working collaboratively; and learn to assess their performances in and contributions to a collaborative relationship.

Credits: 6

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Graduate.
Enrollment limited to students in the MA 9525 or MA 9527 programs.

ENGL 698 -  Selected Topics  

A Selected Topics course is a normal, departmental offering which is directly related to the discipline, but because of its specialized nature, may not be able to be offered on a yearly basis by the department.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 700 -  Independent Study  

Independent Study courses give students the opportunity to pursue research and/or studies that are not part of the university's traditional course offerings. Students work one on one or in small groups with faculty guidance and are typically required to submit a final paper or project as determined by the supervising professor.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 750 -  Internship  

Professional experiences geared to students'' vocational goals. Writing for newspapers, magazines, and social welfare agencies, film production with filmmakers, and other job-related experiences.

Credits: 3-6

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 790 -  Experimental  

A unique and specifically focused course within the general purview of a department which intends to offer it on a "one time only" basis and not as a permanent part of the department's curriculum.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment limited to students with a semester level of Graduate.

ENGL 795 -  Workshop  

A workshop is a program which is usually of short duration, narrow in scope, often non-traditional in content and format, and on a timely topic.

Credits: 1-6

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 798 -  Selected Topics  

A Selected Topics course is a normal, departmental offering which is directly related to the discipline, but because of its specialized nature, may not be able to be offered on a yearly basis by the department.

Credits: 1-3

Term(s) Typically Offered: Offered as Needed

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.

ENGL 800 -  Master's Thesis  

Students pursuing a thesis program should contact their academic advisor concerning research after completing about one-half of their degree coursework. The advisor will assist the student with the necessary steps (such as preliminary selection of a topic and arranging for the appointment of a committee) to proceed.

Credits: 3

Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students.